Mentoring

The mentoring programme brings together students and graduates of the Schools of Applied Chemistry, Informatics, Engineering, and Textiles & Design. The ESB Business School offers its students its own mentoring programme.

The main aim is to offer students individual support in all matters concerning careers and job applications from experienced graduates. In this way, the students find a competent contact person while the mentors remain in contact with the University and receive information about   the content and procedures of current degree programmes. At the same time, mentors can obtain important additional qualifications.

Pass on your experience

  • Looking for an industrial placement/internship (branch, function…)
  • Applications
  • Career paths (what happens next after graduation?)
  • Choice of degree programme specialisations
  • Working abroad

Information for Mentors

Who can become a mentor? What is expected from mentors, how can you apply and what does the University contribute to the mentoring programme?

Who can become a mentor?

  • Any graduates who can take the time at work and who are interested in giving a helping hand to young people.
  • Any graduates who have successfully entered their chosen career and who have been working for at least 12 months.
  • Any graduates of the Schools of Applied Chemistry, Informatics, Engineering, and Textiles & Design and their predecessors.
  • Anyone who sends us their application form with as much information as possible.
  • A place on the programme cannot be guaranteed! This means that not every applicant can be accepted. The number of places depends on the number of available mentees.

What is expected from Mentors?

  • First, that you have given thought to your career path and to your decision. You should be able to demonstrate that success is possible but also to realise that it doesn’t have to be exactly the same for everyone!
  • You must keep to agreements with your mentee.
  • Optimally, you should be able to establish personal contact with your mentee, that is, he or she should be able to visit you at your place of work. However, this is not absolutely essential.
  • Contact is initiated by the mentees, i.e. the students come with their questions at the beginning.

What does the University contribute to the Mentoring Programme?

  • On the basis of your information, the University will look for a student with the best possible match to your specifications and wishes.
  • We prepare the students for the mentoring programme in an introductory workshop.
  • We provide a sample contract for the mentoring contract between mentor and mentee.
  • We can give advice if any questions or problems arise.

Basics of Mentoring

How long does the mentoring programme last? How does mentoring support my alumni association and who can I turn to if questions or problems arise?

Mentoring should usually last for at least one semester. If both parties agree, this can be extended. Details should be discussed by both parties.

  • Participation in the mentoring programme is voluntary.  The contract is intended to make the relationship binding but nobody should feel that their hands are tied. The important thing is for everyone to remain motivated. If the appointments are merely an obligation for someone, the other person notices this very quickly.
  • A place on the programme cannot be guaranteed! This means that not every applicant can be accepted. The number of places depends on the number of available mentors and mentees.
  • We encourage all participants (alumni and students) to become members of one of the alumni associations of the University. In this way, partnerships can continue beyond the mentoring situation. For students, participation is free (for members of VRI Reutlingen Engineers Association for the 1st year). Participants can also apply for a travel costs allowance for visiting their mentors.
  • Alongside matching, introductory workshops and a sample contract, the University also offers support for any questions and problems which arise during the mentoring relationship.

Photo pin needle: Thomas Siebmann/PIXELIO; Photo in header: ©Reutlingen University